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Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
't have to be as concerned. my colleague, elizabeth cohen is reporting, a person in the their teens, ended up dying. it's not to be an alarmist. this could be presented and if addressed earlier enough can be treated. doesn't mean rush to the hospital by any answer o means but know the symptoms and if they get bad, do go. >> dr. gupta, thank you so have. >>> for numbers on the job front. 371,000 people filed first-time claims last week. up $4,000 from the week before. this is the first unemployment report, by the way, of 2013. when it comes to ending gun violence, vice president joe biden, made it very clear, if congress doesn't pass new gun laws, the president could go it alone as in bypass congress, and issue an executive order. >> the president is going to act. there are executive orders -- executive action that can be taken. weefbt decided what that is yet but we're compiling it all with the help of the attorney general and cabinet members as well as legislative action we believe is require. >> they took his words as a threat. saying it's tripping them of their second ahelpment rights.
. >> the hospital says the health and safety of the patients is the top priority. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. good to see you. >> good to see you. >> this nurse she treats some of the sickest patients and if they get the flu there could be some serious health consequences. >> right, if you or i get the flu it's unpleasant, we're out of work for a couple of days or maybe a week, we don't feel well but we're probably not going to die but when someone is that sick in the hospital or in a hospice, if they get the flu, they could die and in fact 36,000 people a year die from the flu, so it's a serious thing for these patients. >> so this hospital has this mandatory policy. is this becoming more common? >> it is becoming more common because the only protection really for these very sick patients, of course they get the flu shot themselves, but it's so surround them with people who have also been vaccinated, so before around 2005 hospitals didn't really care so much, they didn't really push this, but then they started to push it and look at these numbers. it really tells you s
's check in with dr. ron cohen, the founder and ceo of acorda therapeutics. welcome back to "mad money." >> thanks very much, jim. >> i was going back to our interview in july of last year, and so much has changed. at the time you were only talking about pre-clinical or rat studies of what your drug could be for stroke. since then, i was looking at your presentation this morning -- this week. 66 people with stroke, at least six months trying this. give me the progression. there have got to be people initially happy with the post stroke deficit study. >> well, it's still a blinded study, jim. that means we have no idea who's done well on placebo versus drug, but we're going to find out pretty soon. we're getting the results of that trial in the second quarter of this year. we're very excited to see those results. >> i think people want to understand, it's not just everybody who has had a stroke. it's a particular kind of people who face a stroke problem, right? >> yeah, well, about half the people who have had a stroke wind up with permanent disabilities. as a result, reduced mobility,
. pros and cons of being slightly overweight. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen spells them out next. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their buddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. but with the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. with odor free aspercreme. powerful medicine relieves pain fast, with no odor. so all you notice is relief. aspercreme. >>> this story is for me and probably everybody watching. if you packed on a couple of extra pounds over the holidays, excuse me, you might not have to worry so much about it. according to a new study, being a little overweight might help you live longer. elizabeth cohen is our senior medical correspondent. i'm going to live to be 150 then. >> oh, please. you're one of the most fit people i know. >> it sounds counterintuitive. help us understand this. we can ditch our diet. >> we have been preached at all thes
is there. >> wall street is it watching sac capital, steve cohen, one of the largest hedge fund managers out there, the company and he reportedly disclosed that the firm received a wells notice from the sec which means it could be sued for securities laws violations. is that true? >> i -- >> can you comment? >> i will not comment on any investigation but as you bring up insider trading i will note over 160 cases in the last three years. nearly $900 million in illegal gains or losses avoided we have charged. so another area we have been extremely vigorous and active. >> how many insider trading cases are currently in the pipeline? are there dozens more you're looking into, is that fair to say? >> i don't want to put a number on it and remains a high priority and active area. >> what about in high speed trading, high frequency trading? the sec is concerned about that. are you looking into any potential securities law violations with high speed trading or high frequency trading? >> look, we're looking at a sort of number of actors and transactions in the market structure case. we brought ca
-old boy is wondering how this common treatable virus could take the life of their son. elabeth cohen is joining us. she spent the morning with the family. elizabeth, how did this happen? >> reporter: wolf, it was such an emotional morning. i'm in front of the church that the family attends. mack was 17. that personified who he was. as you said, perfectly healthy. on december 21st he started feeling sick, a headache, a little bit tired. he had a fever but really no big deal and he was better in about two days and he then he felt fine for a while. and then a couple days later he started feeling bad again. his parents took him to a local hospital in the rural area they were in and they said he's got the flu and his kidneys are failing. they said, we have to get him to a bigger hospital. they put him on a helicopter and this is what max said to his mother as he was getting on the helicopter. >> one of the last coherent things he said, he looked at me and tears were rolling down his face. >> he was scared. >> he said, mom, i'm scared. i said, i know, buddy. i am, too. he said, mom, it's g
, vice president of the national fair housing alliance. then alys cohen, staff attorney for the national consumer law center. and then if i move all the way to my right inside, susan wachter who is a professor for state and finance at wharton school at the university of pennsylvania. david moskowitz is deputy general counsel at wells fargo, and karen thomas, senior executive vice president of government relations at the independent community bankers association of america. thank you all for being here. and perhaps we might start with you, mr. calhoun. >> thank you. today, the cfpb announces one of its most important rules, a qualified mortgage ability-to-repay rule, along with the upcoming mortgage servicing rules that will come out next week, address failures in the mortgage market, the devastated -- a devastating millions of families and our overall economic. twin drivers of this were widespread, unaffordable loans, and a broken mortgage servicing system that severely aggravated the ensuing wave of foreclosures. the goal of the dodd-frank legislation, the rule today, our to redirect in
issues. >> woodruff: but tennessee democrat steve cohen warned about the consequences of not taking the senate deal. >> my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't get together and do something. >> woodruff: later house democratic leaders emerged from a nearly three-hour meeting with vice president biden, who helped broker the senate deal. minority leader nancy pelosi called for action. >> we look forward now as we go forward in this day to see what the timing will be for a straight up-or-down vote on what passed 89-8 last night in the united states senate. >> woodruff: house republicans also met and gave no sign they were ready to call a vote on the senate bill. instead majority leader eric cantor said he won't support the measure. and others left open the possibility of changing the bill. and sending it back to the senate. >> woodruff: the story at this hour still unfolding at the house but all signs are pointing to a vote on the senate compromise later tonight. we get an update now froms in regular todd zwillich. h
issues. >> woodruff: tennessee democrat steve cohen warned about the consequences of not taking the senate deal. >> my district can't afford to wait a few days and have the stock market go down 300 points tomorrow if we don't ghettoing and do something. >> woodruff: later house democratic leaders emerged from a nearly three-hour meeting with vice president biden who helped broker the senate deal. minority leader nancy pelosi called for action. >> we look forward now as we go forward in this day to see what the timing will be for a straight up-or-down vote on what passed 89-8 last night in the united states senate. >> woodruff: house republicans also met and gave no sign they were ready to call a vote on the senate bill. instead majority leader eric cantor said he won't support the measure. and others left open the possibility of changing the bill. and sending it back to the senate. so how will the twists and turns play out? we turn to newshour regular todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international, and was there for the senate vote
the playing field? >> for us it's always about what's in folks' hearts. we have cohen who gets an a on our report card, and we have a new senator like tim scott who is black gets an f every year. when i look at senator scott, i'm very glad that going into the 150th celebration, if you will. of the eman pags prok clags we have one black senator. we should have at least 10. when i look at him, you know, i say quite frankly what wuch my old coaches said about me in a sport i wasn't so good aat. he has nothing but potential. there's nothing but room to improve. we would hope that he would not continue to get fs on the naacp report card? >> is that because he's a republican or what's behind it? >> no. we have republicans that believe in civil rights. unfortunately, he's not one of them, and unfortunately his party as you know has really gone after so-called rhinos as they call them, these republican whoe believe in civil rights again and again. so, you know, for instance, you take senator specter there recently. he was very good on the same sorts of justice issues i was talking about. you know,
to the hospital. our senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen joins us by phone from louisville, texas. we have you on the phone because we know you're working on a flu story about kids. give us a preview. >> it's a terrible story of a completely healthy 17-year-old boy who got the flu, you know, kids get the flu, it happens, but it did not, he got very sick, very quickly and unfortunately, he ended up passing away, and this is what sometimes happens with kids. kids can look completely fine, and in less than 24 hours, or about 24 hours later that child is on a respirator in the intensive care unit, and a lot of these kids are just completely healthy kids with no underlying health problems and we don't know why most kids are okay with the flu. they're sick for a little while and get better. some of them die, we just don't know why. >> is it too late to get a flu vaccine to protect our kids, to protect ourselves? >> it isn't too late. that's one of two things i'll tell parents to do, to be empowered parents. this is so crucial. one, get your child the flu shot. we heard that people are still
virus that has some awful symptoms. senior medical correspondent elizabeth cohen is here with us. what is this sydney 2012? >> sydney 2012 is a strain of something called norovirus, which a lot of people call smum fl stomach flu, not the right terminology, but icky for want of a better phrase. we're talking about forceful vomiting. we're talking diarrhea. it is really not pleasant. >> yeah. something you don't want to go to work with. nobody wants this. how do we stop this from coming into our bodys? >> you know, to some extent you can't. it is incredibly contagious. if you're sick now and god forbid you were vomiting, i would be in real trouble. wash your hands a lot with soap and water. you can use an alcohol-based sterilizer but you should be doing soap and water. wash down surfaces and remember that even after you're better, you can still be contagious. and so don't cook for other people for a little while, or if you do, be really careful. >> this is what i find fascinating. i could have it and give it to other people and not even know it. >> exactly. some people have this virus, b
, like when william cohen. can you compare when william cohen was nominated as a republican by a democratic president as opposed to senator hagel? >> we've heard republicans say that chuck hagel ceased being a republican several years ago. they were concerned when he voted against -- remember, he voted against the iraq surge. he was against it. he differed from the bush administration on a number of things and i think a lot of republicans feel that he sort of left the party a while back. >> brian: jennifer griffin at the white house for a very good reason. news secretary of defense is going to be nominated today. thanks. >> gretchen: another controversial issue was general mccrystal. remember over in afghanistan he was leading the charge there and he gave an interview to the rolling stone magazine. in that, there were many revelations about how he felt about president obama and his administration. subsequently, mccrystal did resign. >> brian: i will say this, he was never quoted, criticizing the administration. others were saying that's how he felt. but he never blamed anybo
. cohen. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee is recognized for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you. i appreciate the moment. i just -- this has been a very interesting couple of days. ones that i would normally have spent with friends in memphis drinking champagne and looking forward to the new year. it's been an honor serving with you, mr. dreier. you are an outstanding member, as ms. slaughter said, and there are lots of other people on the aisle who are fine republicans who i'm friendses with and think the world of -- friends with and think the world of. but i'm happy this day ended the way it did. and somehow, we're going to end up not falling off the fiscal cliff and i think that's wonderful. so i thank ms. slaughter for the time and i thank speaker boehner for whatever he's done to produce this -- what i suspect will be a positive result for the american people. i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california. mr. dreier: mr. speaker, i'll continue to reserve the balance
. mr. cohen: i want to join in congratulating the university of louisville on their success. the university of louisville has been a rival of the university of memphis but this past year or so, louisville's basketball coach, rick pitino, was good enough to champion the university of memphis getting into the big east conference. it was support we needed, support we appreciate. the conference isn't quite the same as it was when he did that but it was a good thing to do. we have a good rivalry and i think we need to support our rivals. we hope the rivalry continues for many more years to come. i yield back the balance of my time the speaker pro tempore: the chair announces the speaker's appointment pursuant to 22 u.s.c. 1928-a and the order of the house of january 3, 2013, of the following member on the part of the house, the united states group of the nato parliamentary assembly. the clerk: mr. turner of ohio, chairman. the speaker pro tempore: the chair announces the speaker's appointment pursuant to 2 u.s.c. 2003 and the order of the house of january 3, 2013, of the followi
the political buzz saws are out again. like hagel, william cohen was a republican senator before he was bill clinton's secretary of defense. >> i think he will face the same challenge in terms of people on the democratic side saying, hey, wait. we've got some pretty talented people that could step in at a moment's notice and fill that spot. and the republicans will say, why are you helping out a democratic administration? >> reporter: one key republican already is challenging hagel. >> i am concerned about many of the comments that he made and has made, like reference to, quote, jewish lobby, which i don't believe exists. i believe a pro-israel lobby exists. >> reporter: other insist hagel is not anti-israel. >> he belongs to a tough-minded, in this case, republican view of israel that, in fact, accepts the reality that while the united states and israel are very close allies and will remain close allies, their views on every issue cannot be expected to coincide. >> reporter: critics in the gay and lesbian community have turned around their opposition to hagel. in 1998, hagel opposed james h
? the gentleman from dn ised for one minute. mr. cohen: thank you, mr. speaker. we just fin innered the read -- finished the reading of the constitution. that's fine. it's a majestic document. it's never bad to read. it but it's one thing to read it and another thing to really understand it. to understand it you have to understand the court decisions and how the courts have interpreted the constitution. the courts have recognized the constitution as a living, evolving document and that it's not perfect. congress had to pass an amendment to formally abolish slavery and it took the supreme court and the board of education vs. brown case to apolish jim crow, the tell-child of slavery. and a great stain on this country's history. thanks to roe v. wade, women have a fundamental right to make decisions about their own bodies, a right that continues to be threatened by this congress. and while the constitution grants great freedoms, the courts recognize that they come with reasonable limitations. the first amendment gives us freedom of speech but doesn't allow us to yell fire in a theater. and the
. wolf. >> elizabeth cohen with that report, thank you. >>> we can guarantee a harbaugh will coach the winning team in the super bowl. one of the best stories in the super bowl, even if the two coaches don't want to talk about it we're all having such a great year in the gulf, we've decided to put aside our rivalry. 'cause all our states are great. and now is when the gulf gets even better. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 after that, it's on to germany. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 then tonight, i'm trading 9500 miles away in japan. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 with the new global account from schwab, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 i hunt down opportunities around the world tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 as if i'm right there. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 and i'm in tot
correspondent elizabeth cohen is in texas, one of the hardest hit states. >> reporter: wolf, kids are especially vulnerable to the flu. and parents need to be really vigilant. i spent the day yesterday with one mom who got her son help in the nick of time. >> reporter: darius is so sick with the flu, he's in the hospital. he could've died if not for the quick thinking of his mother. she was keeping a close eye on her son at home. he didn't seem all that sick, then suddenly wednesday night -- >> he couldn't hard breathe. he was, you know, gasping for, you know, breath and that was real scary because i thought he was going to pass out at any minute. >> she immediately brought her 7-year-old son to the emergency room. by the time they got there, darius was incoherent. >> how did you feel in your heart when your own son didn't know who you are? >> you don't want to think the worst, but as a parent, you can't help it, you know. >> the flu had struck darius hard. his asthma making it even worse. doctors had to give him oxygen. he's recovering here at cook children's hospital in ft. worth, texas. so be
because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 mont, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, a we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> a google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is certainly not an elected coun
will publish a book because -- >> that's right. >> you and google idea director jerry cohen are publishing a book called "the new digital age." can you give us an idea or preview on what the book is going to cover? i presume some of the things you have been talking about. >> we sat down over the last 18 months, traveled around the world and talked to people about where they thought technology was going and more importantly, how society would adapt to it, and we came to the end of the book with a very optimistic view of this. a simple way of thinking about it, let's go back to the economist. it covers dictators, economic problems, corruption, technological innovation, health care issues and general sort of things. >> and google occasionally. >> last week. >> yes, we were on the cover and covered us as well. so let's go through each of those. how to you solve the back dictator problem? you empower the simpsons. unless the dictator is willing to some out down the internet and shoot everybody can they're getting desperate enough to do, it puts a real check and balance, even china which is cert
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)